Calendar

The SCC will be holding virtual meetings for the 2021-2022 club season. The public -in limited numbers- are welcome to join us for the virtual meetings. Please go to the Virtual Meeting Request page to request an invitation to the next meeting.
Our meetings are held at 7:30pm on Wednesday evenings in the Reformed Church of Syracuse.
For event descriptions, click event header button or an event date.
Sept 2021 - May 2022 Schedule
Workshops
 
Competitions
 
Image Shows
 
September 1
September 22
September 29
Members Share Their Two Best Images
Presented by Guy Swenson with help from you.
Steve Parker
Statement: How do I judge my own work? Do I like the photograph? That's all that matters. While judging photographs, I always tell the audience that this is only how I feel about the work. I am just a person who has been in love with photography for over 50 years. Is the image visually pleasing? Show visual impact? Would it catch my eye if I saw it hanging in a gallery? These are some of the considerations I use when judging.
Presentations
TBA
October 6
October 20
October 27
Photographing Groups of People
Presented by Joan Heffler
Brian Mittelstaedt
Statement: Intention - A photo needs to have a point and point of view. A photo of a beautiful thing/person is NOT enough. Say something photographically. Emotion - Make me feel something! If you weren't that excited when you clicked the shutter, it's unlikely that anyone else will be.
Presentations
TBA
November 3
November 17
 
Architectural Photography
Presented by Don Cochran
Scott Trimble
Statement: What makes a terrific photograph for me is if the photographer conveyed herself in it. I have seen composition and vision achieved but poor technical execution, and vice versa. It is a matter of getting all those elements balanced enough that the personality, the essence of the photographer comes through. It comes from technical know-how, empathy, sore knees and chapped hands. I try and follow the mantra a mentor shared with me, "show them what they missed–even if they were there too." In the end, if I see a photo and I immediately yearn to have been the one who shot it, that photo won me over.
December 1
December 15
 
TBA
Presented by Scott Trimble
Willson Cummer
Statement: I like to see pictures that surprise me and that show thoughtful choices made by the artist. It’s much harder to make a successful picture of a beautiful subject than it is to make a striking picture from mundane material. This is particularly true of foreign travel: the photographer is usually unable to see beyond the exotic subjects.
January 5
January 19 – Architectural Photography
January 26
Conservation Photography: Preserving the natural world with visual stories
Presented by Steven Johnson
Meredith Cantor-Feller
Statement: When looking at images of architecture, Meredith is drawn to the elements of design that transcend the presented forms. The rule of thirds, continuation, contrast, repetition are just a few design techniques that elevate architectural documentation to fine art. Architecture is often used to transport the viewer to an era. Images that intentionally avoid time specific details like people and vehicles help support the idea of architecture as emotion and not simply structures.
Theme: Architectural Photography
Photographing the design aesthetics of buildings and structures. It can include shooting building exteriors or interiors as well as bridges, other structures and cityscapes. Parts of structures are acceptable. People may be in the photograph but should not be the center of interest.
Presentations
TBA
February 2
February 16
February 23
Macro Photography
Presented by Mike Moats
Mike Greenlar
Statement: What makes a quality image? It has to sing and dance. It has to have harmony. All the moons have to line up. No antlers coming out of heads please. It can be so simple or have all the layers working at the same time. It can make one laugh or cry or cry out in indignation. To quote a friend, “a quality image is the closest thing we have to a time machine.”
Presentations
TBA
March 2
March 16 – Black and White
March 30
Photographing People While Traveling
Presented by Neil Lawner
Chris Murray
Statement: Aside from the obvious technical criteria, a good photograph is one that thoughtfully and clearly articulates what the photographer is trying to convey, whether it's a particular emotion or simply what is important in the scene. What I look for is a photo that goes beyond outward appearances and is infused with something of the photographer's own imagination, for this is the basis of creativity. With regards to black and white photography, the best photographs come from scenes that have interesting differences in luminosity (brightness) that translate into tonal variations in black and white. Scenes with strong graphical content in terms of line, shape, form, and texture also lend themselves well to black and white.
Theme: Black and White
A photograph consisting entirely of blacks, whites, and shades of gray.
Presentations
TBA
April 6
April 20
April 27
Abstract Photography
Presented by Chris Morse
Michelle Gabel
Statement: My favorite photos tell a story, evoke emotion and transport the viewer into another time and place. This can be achieved in various ways—through choice of subject, light, composition and more. For me, a good photograph makes people care.
Presentations
TBA
May 4
May 18 – Wildlife
May 25
Photographing Families and Children
Presented by Kim Koza
TBA
Statement:
Theme: Wildlife
A photograph of living, non-domesticated mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, or insects. Wildlife in captivity is acceptable. The image must include an actual live animal or part of a live animal as an important part of the image. Humans or plants may appear in the image but should not be the center of interest.
June 2022 Schedule
Competition
Year-End Judging
Banquet
June 1
June TBA
June 22
TBA
Statement:
Members and invited guests
Not open to members or public.
September 1: Members Share Their Two Best Images
Presented by Guy Swenson with help from you.
October 6: Photographing Groups of People
Presented by Joan Heffler
November 3: Architectural Photography
Presented by Don Cochran
December 1: TBA
Presented by Scott Trimble
January 5: Conservation Photography: Preserving the natural world with visual stories
Presented by Steven Johnson
February 2: Macro Photography
Presented by Mike Moats
March 2: Photographing People While Traveling
Presented by Neil Lawner
April 6: Abstract Photography
Presented by Chris Morse
May 4: Photographing Families and Children
Presented by Kim Koza
September 22: Steve Parker
Statement: How do I judge my own work? Do I like the photograph? That's all that matters. While judging photographs, I always tell the audience that this is only how I feel about the work. I am just a person who has been in love with photography for over 50 years. Is the image visually pleasing? Show visual impact? Would it catch my eye if I saw it hanging in a gallery? These are some of the considerations I use when judging.
October 20: Brian Mittelstaedt
Statement: Intention - A photo needs to have a point and point of view. A photo of a beautiful thing/person is NOT enough. Say something photographically. Emotion - Make me feel something! If you weren't that excited when you clicked the shutter, it's unlikely that anyone else will be.
November 17: Scott Trimble
Statement: What makes a terrific photograph for me is if the photographer conveyed herself in it. I have seen composition and vision achieved but poor technical execution, and vice versa. It is a matter of getting all those elements balanced enough that the personality, the essence of the photographer comes through. It comes from technical know-how, empathy, sore knees and chapped hands. I try and follow the mantra a mentor shared with me, "show them what they missed–even if they were there too." In the end, if I see a photo and I immediately yearn to have been the one who shot it, that photo won me over.
December 15: Willson Cummer
Statement: I like to see pictures that surprise me and that show thoughtful choices made by the artist. It’s much harder to make a successful picture of a beautiful subject than it is to make a striking picture from mundane material. This is particularly true of foreign travel: the photographer is usually unable to see beyond the exotic subjects.
January 19: Meredith Cantor-Feller
Statement: When looking at images of architecture, Meredith is drawn to the elements of design that transcend the presented forms. The rule of thirds, continuation, contrast, repetition are just a few design techniques that elevate architectural documentation to fine art. Architecture is often used to transport the viewer to an era. Images that intentionally avoid time specific details like people and vehicles help support the idea of architecture as emotion and not simply structures.
Theme: Architectural Photography
Photographing the design aesthetics of buildings and structures. It can include shooting building exteriors or interiors as well as bridges, other structures and cityscapes. Parts of structures are acceptable. People may be in the photograph but should not be the center of interest.
February 16: Mike Greenlar
Statement: What makes a quality image? It has to sing and dance. It has to have harmony. All the moons have to line up. No antlers coming out of heads please. It can be so simple or have all the layers working at the same time. It can make one laugh or cry or cry out in indignation. To quote a friend, “a quality image is the closest thing we have to a time machine.”
March 16: Chris Murray
Statement: Aside from the obvious technical criteria, a good photograph is one that thoughtfully and clearly articulates what the photographer is trying to convey, whether it's a particular emotion or simply what is important in the scene. What I look for is a photo that goes beyond outward appearances and is infused with something of the photographer's own imagination, for this is the basis of creativity. With regards to black and white photography, the best photographs come from scenes that have interesting differences in luminosity (brightness) that translate into tonal variations in black and white. Scenes with strong graphical content in terms of line, shape, form, and texture also lend themselves well to black and white.
Theme: Black and White
A photograph consisting entirely of blacks, whites, and shades of gray.
April 20: Michelle Gabel
Statement: My favorite photos tell a story, evoke emotion and transport the viewer into another time and place. This can be achieved in various ways—through choice of subject, light, composition and more. For me, a good photograph makes people care.
May 18: TBA
Statement:
Theme: Wildlife
A photograph of living, non-domesticated mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, or insects. Wildlife in captivity is acceptable. The image must include an actual live animal or part of a live animal as an important part of the image. Humans or plants may appear in the image but should not be the center of interest.
June 1: TBA
Statement:
September 29: Presentations
TBA
October 27: Presentations
TBA
January 26: Presentations
TBA
February 23: Presentations
TBA
March 30: Presentations
TBA
April 27: Presentations
TBA