Calendar

The SCC will be holding virtual meetings for the 2020-2021 club season. The public -in limited numbers- are welcome to join us for the virtual meetings. Please go to the Virtual Meeting Request page to request an invitation to the next meeting.
Our meetings are held at 7:30pm on Wednesday evenings in the Reformed Church of Syracuse.
For event descriptions, click event header button or an event date.
Sept 2020 - May 2021 Schedule
Workshops
 
Competitions
 
Image Shows
 
September 9
September 16
September 30
Going Virtual
Presented by Guy Swenson with help from others
How to participate in Zoom meetings. How to upload photos for competition on SCC website.
Jamie Young
Statement: Aside from the obviously technical, a well technically executed image is important. The decisions for executing the image to appear a certain way should be intentional in regard to how the image portrays the narrative and/or emotion the photographer wants the viewer to see. Aesthetically I want to see an image that has an interesting narrative and/or emotional power, which is also well framed and composed.
Presentations
TBA by Dan Harris
TBA by Guy Swenson
October 7
October 21
October 28
Maximizing Your Travel Photography
Presented by Bruce Byers (Camera Odysseys)
Lauren Long
Statement: What do I look for in a photograph? I look for an understanding of lighting and composition but also originality. I want to be amazed! Show me a familiar scene in a way I haven’t seen before. The more texture and detail you can show – the closer I can get to something I otherwise would only see from a distance – the more effective the image. Be patient. Understanding of lighting, composition and timing are important. The best camera is the one you have with you at the time. I’m more interested in how you see than what camera you’re shooting with.
Presentations
TBA
November 4
November 18
 
Working on Projects
Presented by Willson Cummer
A single note of music can be attractive, but a collection of notes creates a song or a symphony. In a similar way, an organized group of photographs is more powerful and intriguing than a single image. A project allows a photographer to create themes, meanings and observations that inspire viewers to spend time with the work. • Willson Cummer, a Fayetteville photographer, will share projects of his own and those of other artists. He will talk about how to identify a project, how to work on it, complete it, and share it as a website portfolio, a book, or a gallery show. • Participants are invited to prepare to share up to 10 images that could become a project, and Willson will provide helpful feedback. We will share as much student work as time allows.
Scott Trimble
Statement: What makes a terrific photograph for me is if the photographer conveyed herself in it. I have seen composition and vision achieved but poor technical execution, and vice versa. It is a matter of getting all those elements balanced enough that the personality, the essence of the photographer comes through. It comes from technical know-how, empathy, sore knees and chapped hands. I try and follow the mantra a mentor shared with me, "show them what they missed–even if they were there too." In the end, if I see a photo and I immediately yearn to have been the one who shot it, that photo won me over.
December 9
December 16
 
Street Shooting
Presented by Steve Parker
What has worked for me over the last 50 years.
Ken Hubbard
Statement: I know this may go against some ideas of what judging a photo contest is, but when viewing an image I do not get caught up in the constraints of “what makes a perfect image” or how close a submission is to being perfect. I feel photography is an individual expression and if an image isn’t exactly perfect, but conveys a strong message and stirs the emotions of the viewer, it is a successful. The basics of a photograph do need to be strong, as in composition, exposure and what should be within the frame and what should be left out. Even in the simplest of images can be strong and should draw the viewer in and make them want to look deeper into it. When it comes to post capture, I believe some images need work and some can be left alone. There is a delicate balance to know how much or how little work should go into an image once it has been taken. I believe in this digital age programs like Lightroom and Photoshop can be your best friend but also your enemy if not executed well.
January 6
January 20 – Trees
January 27
Creating Effective Compositions
Presented by Chris Murray
Composition is one of the most important aspects of photography, but is much more than a set of guidelines and templates. In this workshop Chris Murray will take you through the steps involved in creating compositions that effectively communicate to the viewer what is important in the scene and what we are trying to say. Through many examples Chris will discuss the elements of visual design, creating visual balance, and the dangers of following the "rules" of composition too closely. We will also address some of the common pitfalls in composing landscape images.
Chris Murray
Statement: Aside from the obvious technical criteria, a good photograph is one that thoughtfully and clearly articulates what the photographer is trying to convey, whether it's a particular emotion or simply what is important in the scene. What I look for is a photo that goes beyond outward appearances and is infused with something of the photographer's own imagination, for this is the basis of creativity.
Theme: Trees
A tree is a large woody perennial plant with a distinct trunk giving rise to branches or leaves at some distance from the ground. The image must include an actual tree or part of a tree as an important part of the image. No tree shapes, shoe trees, family trees, etc. For the purposes of this competition palm trees are considered trees.
Presentations
TBA by Willson Cummer
February 3
February 17
February 24
Documentary Photography
Presented by Steven Sewell
What is it, what it looks like across history and it's relevance to our contemporary moment.
Steve Parker
Statement: How do I judge my own work? Do I like the photograph? That's all that matters. While judging photographs, I always tell the audience that this is only how I feel about the work. I am just a person who has been in love with photography for over 50 years. Is the image visually pleasing? Show visual impact? Would it catch my eye if I saw it hanging in a gallery? These are some of the considerations I use when judging.
Presentations
TBA
March 3
March 17 – Portraits
March 31
Making Beautiful Landscape Photographs
Presented by Norm Schillawski
Greg Heisler
Statement: As the legendary portrait photographer Edward Steichen once said: “A portrait is not made in the camera, but on either side of it.”
Theme: Portraits
A portrait is a collaboration between the photographer and the subject. For our purposes, a portrait is NOT a candid photo of someone actually doing something. They’ve stopped whatever they’re doing to have their picture taken. While they don’t have to smile and look at the camera, they are clearly aware they’re having their portrait made. Greg expects your very best portraits. A portrait should really convey a feeling about the person; merely capturing their likeness is what photography already does by itself. The key is what you bring to the portrait.
Presentations
TBA
April 7
April 21
April 28
Digital Black and White Photography: From taking to editing
Presented by Meredith Cantor-Feller
Meredith Cantor-Feller
Statement: In a photograph I am looking for craftsmanship, composition, and content. Craftsmanship refers to the quality of care taken in presentation and the understanding of the technology being used in the making of the piece. Composition encompasses the elements of design, rule of thirds and how the artist addresses depth and space in the image. Lastly content is the overall clarity of an idea the artist is trying to convey and the symbols used in the image to express that idea.
Presentations
TBA
May 5
May 19 – Birds
 
Photographing Hummingbirds
Presented by Jeff Perkins
Jeff will review equipment, techniques and tips that will help you become a great hummingbird photographer!!
Carol Keeler
Statement: 1. Good composition. 2. Make it interesting and tell a story. 3. The bird’s eye should be sharp. 4. Try for a clear, simple background. 5. Good lighting is essential.
Theme: Birds
A group of warm blooded vertebrates characterized by feathers toothless beaked jaws. The laying of hardshell eggs and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. The image must include an actual bird or part of a bird as an important part of the image.
June 2021 Schedule
Competition
Year-End Judging
Banquet
June 2
June TBA
June 23
Brian Mittelstaedt
Statement: Intention - A photo needs to have a point and point of view. A photo of a beautiful thing/person isn't enough. Say something, photographically. Emotion - Make me feel, something! If you weren't that excited when you clicked the shutter, it's unlikely that anyone else will be.
Members and invited guests
Not open to members or public.
September 9: Going Virtual
Presented by Guy Swenson with help from others
How to participate in Zoom meetings. How to upload photos for competition on SCC website.
October 7: Maximizing Your Travel Photography
Presented by Bruce Byers (Camera Odysseys)
November 4: Working on Projects
Presented by Willson Cummer
A single note of music can be attractive, but a collection of notes creates a song or a symphony. In a similar way, an organized group of photographs is more powerful and intriguing than a single image. A project allows a photographer to create themes, meanings and observations that inspire viewers to spend time with the work. • Willson Cummer, a Fayetteville photographer, will share projects of his own and those of other artists. He will talk about how to identify a project, how to work on it, complete it, and share it as a website portfolio, a book, or a gallery show. • Participants are invited to prepare to share up to 10 images that could become a project, and Willson will provide helpful feedback. We will share as much student work as time allows.
December 9: Street Shooting
Presented by Steve Parker
What has worked for me over the last 50 years.
January 6: Creating Effective Compositions
Presented by Chris Murray
Composition is one of the most important aspects of photography, but is much more than a set of guidelines and templates. In this workshop Chris Murray will take you through the steps involved in creating compositions that effectively communicate to the viewer what is important in the scene and what we are trying to say. Through many examples Chris will discuss the elements of visual design, creating visual balance, and the dangers of following the "rules" of composition too closely. We will also address some of the common pitfalls in composing landscape images.
February 3: Documentary Photography
Presented by Steven Sewell
What is it, what it looks like across history and it's relevance to our contemporary moment.
March 3: Making Beautiful Landscape Photographs
Presented by Norm Schillawski
April 7: Digital Black and White Photography: From taking to editing
Presented by Meredith Cantor-Feller
May 5: Photographing Hummingbirds
Presented by Jeff Perkins
Jeff will review equipment, techniques and tips that will help you become a great hummingbird photographer!!
September 16: Jamie Young
Statement: Aside from the obviously technical, a well technically executed image is important. The decisions for executing the image to appear a certain way should be intentional in regard to how the image portrays the narrative and/or emotion the photographer wants the viewer to see. Aesthetically I want to see an image that has an interesting narrative and/or emotional power, which is also well framed and composed.
October 21: Lauren Long
Statement: What do I look for in a photograph? I look for an understanding of lighting and composition but also originality. I want to be amazed! Show me a familiar scene in a way I haven’t seen before. The more texture and detail you can show – the closer I can get to something I otherwise would only see from a distance – the more effective the image. Be patient. Understanding of lighting, composition and timing are important. The best camera is the one you have with you at the time. I’m more interested in how you see than what camera you’re shooting with.
November 18: Scott Trimble
Statement: What makes a terrific photograph for me is if the photographer conveyed herself in it. I have seen composition and vision achieved but poor technical execution, and vice versa. It is a matter of getting all those elements balanced enough that the personality, the essence of the photographer comes through. It comes from technical know-how, empathy, sore knees and chapped hands. I try and follow the mantra a mentor shared with me, "show them what they missed–even if they were there too." In the end, if I see a photo and I immediately yearn to have been the one who shot it, that photo won me over.
December 16: Ken Hubbard
Statement: I know this may go against some ideas of what judging a photo contest is, but when viewing an image I do not get caught up in the constraints of “what makes a perfect image” or how close a submission is to being perfect. I feel photography is an individual expression and if an image isn’t exactly perfect, but conveys a strong message and stirs the emotions of the viewer, it is a successful. The basics of a photograph do need to be strong, as in composition, exposure and what should be within the frame and what should be left out. Even in the simplest of images can be strong and should draw the viewer in and make them want to look deeper into it. When it comes to post capture, I believe some images need work and some can be left alone. There is a delicate balance to know how much or how little work should go into an image once it has been taken. I believe in this digital age programs like Lightroom and Photoshop can be your best friend but also your enemy if not executed well.
January 20: Chris Murray
Statement: Aside from the obvious technical criteria, a good photograph is one that thoughtfully and clearly articulates what the photographer is trying to convey, whether it's a particular emotion or simply what is important in the scene. What I look for is a photo that goes beyond outward appearances and is infused with something of the photographer's own imagination, for this is the basis of creativity.
Theme: Trees
A tree is a large woody perennial plant with a distinct trunk giving rise to branches or leaves at some distance from the ground. The image must include an actual tree or part of a tree as an important part of the image. No tree shapes, shoe trees, family trees, etc. For the purposes of this competition palm trees are considered trees.
February 17: Steve Parker
Statement: How do I judge my own work? Do I like the photograph? That's all that matters. While judging photographs, I always tell the audience that this is only how I feel about the work. I am just a person who has been in love with photography for over 50 years. Is the image visually pleasing? Show visual impact? Would it catch my eye if I saw it hanging in a gallery? These are some of the considerations I use when judging.
March 17: Greg Heisler
Statement: As the legendary portrait photographer Edward Steichen once said: “A portrait is not made in the camera, but on either side of it.”
Theme: Portraits
A portrait is a collaboration between the photographer and the subject. For our purposes, a portrait is NOT a candid photo of someone actually doing something. They’ve stopped whatever they’re doing to have their picture taken. While they don’t have to smile and look at the camera, they are clearly aware they’re having their portrait made. Greg expects your very best portraits. A portrait should really convey a feeling about the person; merely capturing their likeness is what photography already does by itself. The key is what you bring to the portrait.
April 21: Meredith Cantor-Feller
Statement: In a photograph I am looking for craftsmanship, composition, and content. Craftsmanship refers to the quality of care taken in presentation and the understanding of the technology being used in the making of the piece. Composition encompasses the elements of design, rule of thirds and how the artist addresses depth and space in the image. Lastly content is the overall clarity of an idea the artist is trying to convey and the symbols used in the image to express that idea.
May 19: Carol Keeler
Statement: 1. Good composition. 2. Make it interesting and tell a story. 3. The bird’s eye should be sharp. 4. Try for a clear, simple background. 5. Good lighting is essential.
Theme: Birds
A group of warm blooded vertebrates characterized by feathers toothless beaked jaws. The laying of hardshell eggs and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. The image must include an actual bird or part of a bird as an important part of the image.
June 2: Brian Mittelstaedt
Statement: Intention - A photo needs to have a point and point of view. A photo of a beautiful thing/person isn't enough. Say something, photographically. Emotion - Make me feel, something! If you weren't that excited when you clicked the shutter, it's unlikely that anyone else will be.
September 30: Presentations
TBA by Dan Harris
TBA by Guy Swenson
October 28: Presentations
TBA
January 27: Presentations
TBA by Willson Cummer
February 24: Presentations
TBA
March 31: Presentations
TBA
April 28: Presentations
TBA